Getting Back into Exercise

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You’ve been so busy that you’ve let your exercise routine slip through your fingers over the last few months, and now you want to get back on track. If you’re like most people, the main reason you stopped exercising was that it was too hard, too tiring, or too boring. In the past, exercise was often associated with getting in shape, but nowadays, more people are beginning to realize that exercise can be a very beneficial lifestyle choice. As the popularity of fitness classes, boot camps, and gym membership climbs, more and more people are seeking ways to exercise regularly without having to make it a huge part of their routine. Still, there are some things to keep in mind when you get back into the thick of it.

• Know The Risks

Fitness is a very personal thing. It’s easy to get caught up in the idea of looking good and being fit, but some people are more concerned with being healthy and being able to keep up with their friends. What is important is to focus on the health risks associated with lack of activity.

• Consult Your Doctor

When you get older, your bones become less strong. Your muscles also weaken. However, your body can still keep pushing through, and that’s why we have good health. It’s not always easy to get to fitness and stay there, but there are ways to get back into it and stay there, one of which is getting back on the doctor’s advice if you can still do your usual routines in exercising.

• Set A Goal

Setting benchmarks and goals for the things we work towards is a positive and motivational way to boost our energy and move our bodies. It’s important to set goals because it provides a sense of purpose and conviction. Our goals provide us with a sense of accomplishment, which makes us feel better about ourselves. It also helps our resilience by teaching us how to set up a plan and stick to the plan when the going gets tough.

• Remember To Keep Stretching

Stretching is one of the easiest and most effective exercises to improve mobility and decrease the risk of injuries. It is best to begin a stretching routine after the preceding exercise or workout. There are a couple of ways to stretch: static and dynamic. Static stretching involves holding the stretch for a set amount of time. A dynamic stretch involves stretching in a fluid motion.

• Do Some Walking

When your heart starts racing, you breathe faster and faster, and your muscles tense up. At such times, it can be hard to remember that exercise is good for you. You may feel tired, irritable, and even depressed. When it comes to heart health, walking is the best exercise, according to the American Heart Association. When you compare walking to other forms of exercise, walking is simply the most effective way to improve your heart health. One study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association found that walking 30 minutes at least five days a week decreases the chances of dying from heart disease by 45 percent. Walking has also been shown to help prevent type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity and other cardiovascular diseases.

There are two types of people in this world: those who want to get back into exercise after a long hiatus and think they can just skip over to their exercise regimen without doing anything else first. For the former group, a casual jog around the neighborhood, a weightlifting session at the gym once a month, or a couple of days of light gardening or yard work a week will be just the beginning. Getting back into exercise can be a struggle for many of us, especially if we don’t fight the urge to go back to the couch and snuggle with our favorite blanket. But for those of us who do give exercise another go, it can sometimes be easy to forget not only the benefits of exercise but also the importance of having a routine.

If you’re just like me, you’ve been taking a break from your fitness routine. It can be hard to find the motivation to get back into shape. But there are plenty of reasons to get off the couch and start exercising again. After a while, I started to feel like I was slipping away. I was using exercise as a good excuse for not going to the gym, and even when I did, I had little effect on my body—I always felt fat, even though I knew I wasn’t. I lost my motivation to exercise—it just didn’t seem as great an accomplishment as it used to. I felt like I was constantly working against my own goals. I was starting to question whether the benefits would outweigh the effort.